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Our Primary Mission.


Although adept at performing a wide range of plastic surgery for adults and children, Dr. Wang’s primary mission is to provide specialized care for children born with cleft lip and cleft palate, craniosysnostosis, craniomaxillofacial anomalies, hemangiomas, vascular malformations, birthmarks, congenital nevus, jaw deformity, ear deformity and microtia.

His expertise and success rate with these types of cases has earned him a reputation as one of the leading pediatric plastic surgeons in the nation for children born with cleft lip and cleft palate. Due to his proximity to the U.S./Mexico Border, Dr. Wang serves a large number of patients from the Hispanic population. Our staff is fully bilingual and able to assist you with your appointments and questions about your surgery.

We focus on helping individuals enhance their self-esteem and overall well-being through the latest plastic surgery techniques – whether it’s for adults needing cosmetic surgery or for children born with deformities. We’re here to help.

Pediatric Plastic Surgery

Cleft Lip and Palate
Craniosynostosis
Hemangiomas
Microtia
Hemifacial Microsomia
Facial Reanimation
Pierre Robin Syndrome
Vascular Malformations
Congenital Nevus
Birthmarks
Otoplasty
Poland Syndrome


Cleft Lip and Palate

Cleft lip and cleft palate (also called Harelip) are birth defects that affect the upper lip and roof of the mouth. They happen when the tissue that forms the roof of the mouth and upper lip don't join before birth. The problem can range from a small notch in the lip to a groove that runs into the roof of the mouth and nose. This can affect the way the child's face looks. It can also lead to problems with eating, talking and ear infections.


Treatment

Treatment usually is surgery to close the lip and palate. We often do this surgery in several stages working with a team of medical professionals. The first surgery is usually during the baby's first year. With treatment, most children with cleft lip or palate do well.


Craniosynstosis

Craniosynostosis is a congenital (present at birth) defect that causes one or more sutures on a baby's head to close earlier than normal. Sutures are connections that separate each individual skull bones. The early closing of a suture leads to an abnormally shaped head.


Treatment

The main treatment for craniosynostosis is surgery. Surgery is done while the baby is still an infant. The goals of surgery are to relieve any pressure on the brain, make sure there is enough room in the skull to allow the brain to properly grow and improve the appearance of the child's head.


Hemangioma

A hemangioma is an abnormal build up of blood vessels in the skin or internal organs. The classically recognized hemangioma is a visible red skin lesion that may be in the top skin layers, deeper in the skin, or a mixture of both. Hemangiomas are usually present at birth, although they may appear within a few months after birth, often beginning at a site that has appeared slightly dusky or differently colored than the surrounding tissue.


Treatment

Superficial or "strawberry" hemangiomas often are not treated. When they are allowed to disappear on their own, the result is usually normal-appearing skin. In some cases, a laser may be used to eradicate the small vessels. Cavernous hemangiomas that involve the eyelid and obstruct vision are generally treated with injections of steroids or laser treatments that rapidly reduce the size of the lesions, allowing normal vision to develop. Large cavernous hemangiomas or mixed hemangiomas are treated, when appropriate, with oral steroids and injections of steroids directly into the hemangioma. Surgery is performed on bleeds and ulceration hemangiomas. Also surgery is an option for hemangiomas occurring on visible areas such as the face.


Microtia

Microtia (meaning 'small ear') is a congenital deformity of the pinna (outer ear). It can be unilateral (one side only) or bilateral (affecting both sides). It occurs in 1 out of about 8,000-10,000 births. In unilateral microtia, the right ear is most typically affected.


Treatment

This can be corrected by surgery. Typically, testing is first done to determine if the inner ear is intact and hearing is normal. If hearing is normal, the next step (if a canal is not visible externally) will be to determine if a canal exists, by MRI. For younger patients, this is done under sedation. Surgery may not necessarily be attempted until at a later age (generally about age 8, when the ear is full adult size). Cosmetic surgery (building a new outer ear) is done first to ensure position in relation to the other side. This is done using a medpor implant instead of the patient's own cartilage which is usually taken from ribs or elsewhere. This has improved definition of ear and doesn’t require a chest incision. Surgery to build a canal and/or canal opening can then proceed.


Hemifacial Microsomia

Hemifacial Microsomia is a condition in which the lower half of one side of the face is underdeveloped and does not grow normally. It is sometimes also referred to as first and second brachial arch syndrome, oral-mandibular-auricular syndrome, lateral facial dysplasia, or otomandibular dysostosis. The syndrome varies in severity, but always includes the maldevelopment of the ear and the mandible. This is the second most common facial birth defect after clefts.


Treatment

The surgeries recommended for children with hemifacial microsomia have a goal to improve facial symmetry, by reconstructing the bony and soft tissue, and establishing normal occlusion and joint junction. The timing for such surgeries vary among the surgeons and the severity of the problems.


Facial Reanimation

Facial reanimation is a procedure that attempts to restore some of the patients’ lost facial function. Loss of movement on one side of the face can be devastating. In adults, such a problem can occur as a result of surgery, tumors, accidents, infections or Bell's palsy. A child with congenital facial paralysis is born with complete paralysis of muscles of facial expression on one or both sides. Such paralysis can occur alone or as part of a syndrome such as Moebius Syndrome.


Treatment

This extremely rare condition can now be treated with high expectations. Whatever the cause, we work together with a team of specialists to restore facial expression, especially the ability to smile. Specialists from plastic surgery, speech therapy, and physical therapy provide a coordinated effort to our patients.


Pierre Robin Syndrome

Pierre Robin Syndrome (also called Pierre Robin complex or sequence) is a condition present at birth marked by a very small lower jaw. The tongue tends to fall back and downward and there is cleft soft palate. The lower jaw develops slowly over the first few months of life before birth, but speeds up during the first year after birth. The falling back of the tongue may cause choking episodes and feeding and breathing difficulties, especially when the child sleeps. Infants must be kept face down, which helps the tongue fall forward and keep the airway open. These problems get better over the first few years as the lower jaw grows to a more normal size.


Treatment

In moderate cases, the patient requires placement of a tube through the nose and into the airway to avoid airway blockage. In severe cases, surgery is needed to prevent upper airway obstruction. We favor performing distraction osteogenesis of the mandible, or jawbone, to avoid having to perform a tracheotomy.


Vascular Malformations

Birthmarks, including angiomas and vascular malformations, are benign (noncancerous) skin growths composed of rapidly growing or poorly formed blood vessels or lymph vessels. Found at birth (congenital) or developing later in life (acquired) anywhere on the body, they range from faint spots to dark swellings covering wide areas. These are faint, flat, pink stains that grow as the child grows into larger dark red or purple marks. Some are without symptoms but others bleed if enlarged or injured. Disfiguring port-wine stains can cause emotional and social problems. About 5% of port-wine stains on the forehead and eyelids increase eye pressure due to involvement of the eye and surrounding nerves. Abnormalities of the spinal cord, soft tissues, or bone may be associated with severe port-wine stains.


Treatment

Treatment choices for skin angiomas and vascular malformations depend on their type, location, and severity, and whether they cause symptoms, pain, or disfigurement. No treatment is given, but the mark is regularly examined. This continues until the mark disappears, or requires treatment. This approach is particularly appropriate for the treatment of hemangiomas, which often do not require treatment, since they eventually shrink by themselves.


Congenital Nevus (Birthmarks)

A birthmark is skin marking present at birth that ranges in color from brown or black to bluish or blue-gray. Birthmarks include cafe-au-lait spots, moles, and mongolian spots. Cafe-au-lait spots are a light tan spot, the color of coffee with milk. They may be a normal type of birthmark. The presence of several cafe-au-lait spots larger than a quarter may occur in neurofibromatosis (a genetic disorder that causes abnormal cell growth of nerve tissues).
Moles are small clusters of pigmented skin cells. Nearly everyone has moles, which usually appear after birth. Large moles present at birth (congenital nevi) are more likely to become skin cancer (malignant melanoma). This is especially true if the mole covers an area larger than the size of a fist. All congenital nevi should be examined by a health care provider, and any change in the birthmark should be reported. Watch for changes in the size or color, or sudden ulceration, bleeding, or itching in the birthmark. A mongolian spot (also called a mongolian blue spot) is usually bluish or bruised-looking. It usually appears over the lower back or buttocks, sometimes in other areas including the trunk or arms. These spots are more commonly seen in darker-skinned populations and may persist for months or years. They do NOT become cancer or develop other symptoms.


Treatment

Treatment varies depending on the type of birthmark and associated conditions. Usually no treatment is required for the birthmark itself. Large or prominent nevi that affect the appearance and self-esteem may be covered with special cosmetics. Moles may be removed surgically if they affect the appearance or if they have an increased cancer risk. Be sure to discuss your options with the doctor to decide how and when to remove any moles.


Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

Cosmetic ear surgery is performed to move disproportionately large or prominent ears closer to the head.


Treatment

Thousands of these surgeries are performed successfully each year. The surgery is performed in an outpatient clinic. It may be done under a local anesthetic, which numbs the area around the ears, or under a general anesthetic, which will cause sleep through the entire operation. The procedure usually lasts about 2 hours. During the most common method, a surgeon makes a cut in the back of the ear and removes skin to see the ear cartilage. The cartilage is folded. This reshapes the ear, bringing it closer to the head. Sometimes the cartilage is cut before folding it. Stitches are used to close the wound. The procedure can be done after age 5 or 6, when ear growth is almost complete. However, if disfigurement is severe (lop ears), a child should have surgery early to avoid possible emotional stress when going to school.


Poland Syndrome

Poland syndrome (also Poland's syndrome, Poland's syndactyly and Poland's anomaly) is a rare birth defect characterized by underdevelopment or absence of the chest muscle on one side of the body and webbing of the fingers of the hand on the same side.


Treatment

In many cases, reconstruction of the chest wall muscles, breast, and nipple on the affected side can be corrected with plastic surgery. The existing chest muscles can be used to rebuild the chest. If there is not enough chest muscle for rebuilding, muscle can be taken from other parts of the body. In males, chest reconstruction can be done as early as 13 years old. In females, surgery is postponed until breast development is complete. Plastic surgery may also be able to improve finger deformities through reconstruction and separating webbed fingers.


Adult Plastic Surgery


Breast

Breast Reconstruction
Breast Augmentation
Breast Reduction
Mastopexy (breast lift)

Body

Post-Gastric Bypass Body Contouring
Post Traumatic Facial Reconstruction
Head and Neck Reconstruction
Liposuction
Abdominoplasty (tummy tuck)

Face

Face Lift
Endoscopic Brow Lift
Blepharoplasty (Eye Lid Lift)
Rhinoplasty (Nose)
Maxillofacial Surgery
Botox
Ear Lobe Repair

Skin

Skin Cancer
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
 

Breast Reconstruction

This is surgery that rebuilds the breast contour after mastectomy, or to change the shape, size or position of the breast. A breast implant or the woman's own tissue provides the contour. If desired, the nipple and areola may also be re-created. Reconstruction can be done at the time of mastectomy or any time later.


Breast Augmentation

Augmentation mammaplasty enlarges a woman's breast, usually with implants. A manufactured sac that is filled with silicone gel (a synthetic material containing silicon) or saline (sterile saltwater) is used.


Breast Reduction

Also known as reduction mammaplasty, breast reduction removes excess breast fat, glandular tissue and skin to achieve a breast size in proportion with your body and to alleviate the discomfort associated with overly large breasts.


Mastopexy (Breast Lift)

The breast lift procedure, also known as mastopexy, is performed to lift a breast that sags. It may be done in conjunction with breast implants. Implants may also help lift the breast by increasing the volume of the contents of the breast .


Body


Post-Gastric Bypass Body Contouring

Losing significant excess weight from a gastric bypass procedure can literally save a life. An expected consequence of this extreme weight loss is the accumulation of excess skin on the trunk, arms or legs, which many patients understandably choose to remove. A post gastric bypass procedure is meant to smooth the contour of the body, match the size of the limb(s) with the surrounding skin layers and improve skin health and hygiene by eliminating redundant folds that accumulate perspiration.


Post Traumatic Facial Reconstruction

This surgery is performed following facial trauma and may take as long as 4-14 hours, as the goal is to repair as much as possible in one operation. The surgeon may use bone grafts, taking bone from other parts of the body to repair the facial bones, or fill in smaller areas of missing bone with prosthetic materials and implants. Broken facial bones are held in place with titanium mini-plates and surgical screws. This technique is called rigid fixation. Lacerations (tears) in the face are usually simply closed with stitches. If large areas of skin are missing, the surgeon may use a flap, which is a section of living tissue carrying its own blood supply, from another area of the patient's body and transplant it to the face. Some facial injuries may require the assistance of a neurosurgeon, oral surgeon, or ophthalmologist.


Head and Neck Reconstruction

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Liposuction

Liposuction is a procedure that can help sculpt the body by removing unwanted fat from specific areas, including the abdomen, hips, buttocks, thighs, knees, upper arms, chin, cheeks and neck. It is often used to remove stubborn areas of fat that don't respond to traditional weight-loss methods. During the past decade, liposuction, which is also known as "lipoplasty" or "suction lipectomy," has benefited from several new refinements. Today, a number of new techniques, including ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty (UAL), the tumescent technique, and the super-wet technique, are helping to provide selected patients with more precise results and quicker recovery times.


Abdominoplasty (Tummy Tuck)

Abdominoplasty, known more commonly as a "tummy tuck," is a major surgical procedure to remove excess skin and fat from the middle and lower abdomen and to tighten the muscles of the abdominal wall. The procedure can dramatically reduce the appearance of a protruding abdomen.


Face


Face Lift

As people age, the effects of gravity, exposure to the sun, and the stresses of daily life can be seen in their faces. Deep creases form between the nose and mouth; the jawline grows slack and jowly; folds and fat deposits appear around the neck. A facelift (technically known as rhytidectomy) can't stop this aging process. What it can do is "set back the clock," improving the most visible signs of aging by removing excess fat, tightening underlying muscles, and redraping the skin of your face and neck. A facelift can be done alone, or in conjunction with other procedures such as a forehead lift, eyelid surgery, or nose reshaping.


Endoscopic Brow Lift

A forehead lift or "browlift" is a procedure that restores a more youthful, refreshed look to the area above the eyes. The procedure corrects drooping brows and improves the horizontal lines and furrows that can make a person appear angry, sad or tired. In a forehead lift, the muscles and tissues that cause the furrowing or drooping are removed or altered to smooth the forehead, raise the eyebrows and minimize frown lines. The conventional surgical method is to hide the incision just behind the hairline; or it may be performed with the use of an endoscope, a viewing instrument that allows the procedure to be performed with minimal incisions. Both techniques yield similar results – smoother forehead skin and a more animated appearance.


Blepharoplasty (Eye Lid Lift)

Eyelid surgery (technically called blepharoplasty) is a procedure to remove fat – usually along with excess skin and muscle from the upper and lower eyelids. Eyelid surgery can correct drooping upper lids and puffy bags below your eyes – features that make you look older and more tired than you feel, and may even interfere with your vision. However, it won't remove crow's feet or other wrinkles, eliminate dark circles under your eyes, or lift sagging eyebrows. While it can add an upper eyelid crease to Asian eyes, it will not erase evidence of your ethnic or racial heritage. Blepharoplasty can be done alone, or in conjunction with other facial surgery procedures such as a facelift or browlift.


Rhinoplasty (Nose)

Rhinoplasty, or surgery to reshape the nose, is one of the most common of all plastic surgery procedures. Rhinoplasty can reduce or increase the size of your nose, change the shape of the tip or the bridge, narrow the span of the nostrils, or change the angle between your nose and your upper lip. It may also correct a birth defect or injury, or help relieve some breathing problems.


Maxillofacial Surgery

Maxillofacial Surgery is used to correct a wide spectrum of diseases, injuries and defects in the head, neck, face, jaws and the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region.


Botox

Botox is used to soften facial lines and wrinkles. This procedure works well for forehead lines, crow’s feet, and frown lines. Purified botulinum toxin is injected into the muscle in these areas and works by weakening the muscle, which lessens the lines of facial expression.


Ear Lobe Repair

Plastic surgery to repair a torn earlobe is a frequent occurrence. Piercing an earlobe puts it at risk to tear. In most pierced ears, the pierced hold gradually enlarges over time. Depending on the deformity, reconstruction can take different forms. In all methods, the skin lining the slot is removed creating a raw edge to rebuild. When tissue has been lost, however, the procedure is more complicated, and reconstruction involves creating normal proportions around a somewhat small ear. Repair of a torn earlobe occurs in the plastic surgery office setting using a local anesthetic. The procedure consists of "freshening" the edges of the split and placement of sutures to complete the repair of the earlobe.


Skin


Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands and arms. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs.

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of cancer, with about a million new cases estimated in the U.S. each year. Basal cells line the deepest layer of the epidermis. Basal cell carcinomas are malignant growths – tumors that arise in this layer. Basal cell carcinoma can usually be diagnosed with a simple biopsy and is fairly easy to treat when detected early. However, 5-10 percent of BCCs can be resistant to treatment or locally aggressive, damaging the skin around them, and sometimes invading bone and cartilage. When not treated quickly, they can be difficult to eliminate. Fortunately, however, this is a cancer that has an extremely low rate of metastasis, and although it can result in scars and disfigurement, it is not usually life threatening.


Melanoma

Melanoma is a malignant tumor that originates in melanocytes, the cells which produce the pigment melanin that colors our skin, hair, and eyes. The majority of melanomas are black or brown. However, some melanomas are skin-colored, pink, red, purple, blue or white. Melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer. However, if it is recognized and treated early, it is nearly 100 percent curable. But if it is not, the cancer can advance and spread to other parts of the body, where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal.